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Play like Pogonina: Bronnikova (2297) - Pogonina (2501)

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Written by Natalia Pogonina   
Friday, 29 May 2009
As a "casual Friday" gift let me present to you a tactical shot from one of the games I played at the Russian Women Team Championship this year. Please try to solve this little problem without using any chess engines or viewers.

Image
Black to move and win

That's how the game started:

[Event "10th TCh-RUS w"]
[Site "Dagomys RUS"]
[Date "2009.04.08"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Bronnikova, E."]
[Black "Pogonina, N."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C88"]
[WhiteElo "2297"]
[BlackElo "2501"]
[Annotator "Pogonina"]
[PlyCount "80"]
[EventDate "2009.04.02"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. a4
Bb7 9. axb5 axb5 10. Rxa8 Bxa8 11. d3 d6 12. c3 h6 13. Nbd2 Qd7 14. Nf1 Re8 15.
Ng3 Bf8 16. d4 Na5 17. Bc2 Nc4 18. b3 Nb6 19. h3 Qc6 20. Bb2 Nbd7 21. d5 Qb6
22. Qe2 c6 23. dxc6 Bxc6 24. Rd1 Qb7 25. Nd2 Nc5 26. f3 Ne6 27. Ndf1 d5 28. Bc1
d4 29. cxd4 Nxd4 30. Qf2 Rc8 31. Be3 Nxc2 32. Qxc2 Bxe4 33. Qb2 Rc2 34. Qa1
{see diagram}
{white king seems to be safely protected, but Black breaks up the fortress} Bxf3 35. Rd2 (35. gxf3 Qxf3 36. Rd2
Rxd2 37. Bxd2 Bc5+ {White's pieces are so busy defending each other that the king is left unprotected}
38. Kh2 Qf2+ 39. Kh1 Qg1# {see diagram})

Image

35... Rxd2 36. Nxd2
Bxg2 37. Qxe5 Bxh3 -+ 38. Nde4 Nxe4 39. Nxe4 f5 40. Qe6+ Kh7


Image

{see diagram, the 40th move has been made, so White resigned}
0-1




Comments (4)
1. Written by on 12:55 30 2009 .
 
 
!!
 
2. Written by on 15:52 30 2009 .
 
 
))
Qg1#!
 
3. Written by This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it on 14:03 01 2009 .
 
 
))
Not a very difficult one, but you have to calculate it until the very end in every variation. 
 
The first move 
 
34. ... Bxf3 
 
suggested itself. As the above analysis shows, white can't capture the bishop, because of 35. ... Qxf3 and, after the forced rook exchange, black's dark squared bishop enters decisively with 37. ... Bc5+. So the next move is forced. 
 
35. Rd2 Rxd2 36. Nxd2 
 
Again, if 36. Bxd2 Bc5+. The pawn loss at the 34th move was accepted so that the rook could be recaptured with the knight. 
 
36. ... Bxg2 
 
At this point, I decided not to calculate any further. But the final sequence is very nice and instructive.
 
4. Written by This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it on 04:43 27 2012 .
 
 
GdmpuDFEjVUqFnOfSol
In awe of that anwser! Really cool!
 

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Last Updated ( Friday, 29 May 2009 )
 
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