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GM Areschenko - GM Rustemov annotated by GM Naiditsch

User Rating: / 11
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Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 20 February 2014

By GM Arkadij Naiditsch, #1 German chess player, best FIDE rating - 2737

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We will see a game where Black was too greedy and found himself under a heavy attack. What is nice about the current game is that White was not forcing a direct tactical win, but attacked "positionally" until Black's position practically fell apart.

Areshchenko,Alexander (2714) - Rustemov,Alexander (2538)

Schachbundesliga 2013/2014 (8.2), 09.02.2014


[Arkadij Naiditsch]


1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Areschenko decides to go for a complicated game. [After 3.Nd2 or 3.Nc3 Rustemov is always taking on e4. 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bd7 And Rustemov probably played this position over 10.000 times. He has a lot of games in normal chess, but what he especially likes is to play it against computers. On his different ICC accounts he probably has over 100.000 games played against the machines!]
3...c5 4.c3 Qb6
[It is more usual for Black to start with 4...Nc6 here, but Black has another idea: 4...Nc6]
5.Nf3 Bd7
This is quite a rare move. Of course Black's idea is to exchange the bishop on b5, but it takes quite some time.



6.Bd3 White has a lot of different options here but 6.Bd3 seems to be the main one. Areschenko played in his previous game again L`ami here: [6.a3 Bb5 7.Bxb5+ Qxb5 8.dxc5 Bxc5 9.b4 Bb6 10.a4 Qd7 and Win won after an unclear game.]
6...cxd4 Black tries to first exchange the c-pawn before playing Bb5. [After the immediate 6...Bb5 7.Bxb5+ Qxb5 White has the important 8.a4! Qa6 9.Na3 followed by Nb5 and 00, after which he should have a clear advantage.]
7.Nxd4! This is still theory, but a nice move anyway. The idea is simply not to let Black play Bb5.
7...Bc5
Black is chosing a very risky line and going for the d4 pawn.
8.00 Bxd4 9.cxd4 Qxd4
This is still a theoretical position. White is a pawn down, but a clearly better development, the bishop pair and a chance to dominate on the dark squares are worth it!
10.Nc3
Nb5 is a threat now.
10...a6 This is also a standard move in this position, avoiding the main threat of Nb5.
11.Re1 Bc6



12.Ne2!
A strong move which has been played lately in the game Grischuk-Morozevich from the World Cup tiebreak. 12...Qxe5? This move is too risky and Black almost immediately ends up in a lost position. [12...Qg4 13.h3 Qh5 14.Bf4 Bb5 15.Qb3 Ne7 16.Bxb5+ axb5 17.Qxb5+ Nbc6 18.Qxb7 00 19.Qb3 happened in the game Grischuk-Morozevich with a better position for White, but things are far from clear.]
13.Ng3!
Simple and strong. White is almost fully developed and starts his initiative by attacking the pawns on the kingside.
13...Qc7 14.Qg4! Weakening the dark squares even further.
14...g6
[14...Kf8 was not any better. 15.Nh5 Black cannot defend the g7 pawn in an appropriate way. 15...g6 16.Qd4 e5 This attempt to win a piece leads to a deadly attack for White: 17.Rxe5 gxh5 18.Qb4+ Kg7 19.Rg5+ Kf6 20.Bf4 With an easily winning position.]
15.Qd4
Winning a pawn back.
15...f6
Black already doesn't have anything better.
16.Rxe6+ Kf7




17.Bf4!
White develops the last piece with tempo.
17...Qc8 18.Re3
[18.Rd6 also looks very strong. 18...Nd7 19.Re1 With a winning attack.]
18...a5
Pretty strange play by Black, who doesn't seem to be in a hurry to finish his development. [18...Qd7 was needed. 19.Rae1 Bb5 With the idea of playing Nc6 next. White's position is of course close to winning, but Black is fighting.]
19.Rae1 Qd7
White has a lot of very nice moves here and it is clear that the position should even somehow be tactically winning, but Areschenko finds a very elegant way of not giving his opponent the slightest chance.
20.h4!
A great move. White does not hurry to force things and enjoys his postion by creating an extra weakness on the g6 square.
20...Na6 21.h5
The g6 pawn is under attack. It is difficult to say anything else about Black's position than it just being ugly!
21...Nc7
And finally Areschenko decides that it is time to finish the game:
22.Bxc7 Qxc7 23.Qg4
Black has no way to defend the g6 pawn. To play g5 is of course not a solution because of Nf5. 23...Kf8 24.hxg6 hxg6 25.Bxg6 The material is equal, but White's attack is deadly...
25...Rd8 26.Qd4
Areschenko continues keeping the black pieces very passively. 26...Rh6 Other moves are not much better.



27.Qc5+!
This is the most direct way to put an end to Black's suffering...
27...Qd6
[27...Kg7 is of course losing: 28.Re7+ Nxe7 29.Rxe7+ Qxe7 30.Qxe7+ Kxg6 31.Qxd8]
28.Re8+ Bxe8 29.Rxe8+
And the game is over because of 29...Kg7 30.Nf5. A very easy win for White which clearly shows that being under-developed is very risky, even when you're a pawn up.

10

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Comments (1)
1. Written by This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it on 12:56 21 2014 .
 
 
thx for the analysed game  
could you make more of them with more  
analysis + computer check .
 

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