News
About Natalia
Games
Our Team
Articles
Gallery
Chess Links
Play Chess
Pogonina's Chess Shop
Advertise
Contact Us

Highlights

 Follow Natalia on Twitter:

http://www.pogonina.com/images//nat%20twit.jpg

 



Please help Natalia promote chess by making a donation:

 


 

Women's
chess live ratings

Link to Pogonina.com






Play chess at ChessOk

365Chess.com Biggest Online Chess Games Database


 
 
   More...


Polls
What's your FIDE rating?

What should Natalia do to make Pogonina.com more interesting for you?

Who is your favorite active top player?

Poker or chess: what do you like more?

What's the largest monetary chess prize you ever won?

How much time per day do you spend on chess-related activities?

Do you have a special chess mascot (pen, badge, toy, etc.)?

Which time control do you prefer for over-the-board tournaments?

The strongest women's chess team in the world is

What is the strongest national chess team in the world?

Will Magnus Carlsen's rating reach FIDE 2900?

Do you think you can become a GM?

GM Mamedyarov - GM Karjakin annotated by GM Naiditsch

User Rating: / 9
PoorBest 
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 25 December 2013

By GM Arkadij Naiditsch, #1 German chess player, FIDE 2737

Bookmark and Share

Attention: Chess Evolution has a special Christmas offer for you, dear Pogonina.com reader. Subscribe for the weekly Top GM Secrets bulletin and enter the "Christmas2013" bonus code to get a 25% discount!

Mamedyarov is probably one of the most fighting players currently. In some of his interviews he even said: " I just don't know how to make draws"! And of course he didn't disappoint his fans in this game either. After an interesting opening White quickly takes over and ends the game with a sparkling attack.




Mamedyarov,Shakhriyar (2757) - Karjakin,Sergey (2756) [D90]

SportAccord Rapid Men 2013 Beijing CHN (7.4), 13.12.2013

 

[Arkadij Naiditsch]

 

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 Even Karjakin started to play the Gruenfeld.
4.Nf3 Bg7 5.h4 A shocking looking move, but in fact it is almost the "latest fashion". White is preparing to play h5 as soon as the knight from f6 will move. At the moment White wants to play cxd5 and after Nxd5 to push the very unpleasant h5. Check out GM Hansen's article on the h2-h4 revolution - Pogonina.com.
5...c6



[5...dxc4 is the other main option.]
6.Bg5 With this move White sort of changes his strategy to a more calm one. The idea is now to develop the pieces by playing e3Be2 and hope that the h4 more will be useful someday.
6...Ne4
What can be more logical than to chase the bishop from g5.
7.e3
It it hard to believe for me that Black can be worse with the bishop pair. [An interesting try could have been 7.Bf4!?] 7...Nxg5 There is no reason to think twice about such a move.
8.hxg5
I think we reached the first critical position.
8...e6?
This move just looks terrible to me. Black is closing his own bishop without any reason and it is clear that he will not be in time to play c5 next. White doesn't lose any time and immediately shows where the problems of Black's position are. Now White just wants to play e5 next, so Black is almost forced to take on e4. [8...00 looks much more logical. It is hard to imagine that White is in time to bring his queen to the h-file, which means that the position should be quite unclear.]
9.e4! dxe4 10.Nxe4 Qa5+ is probably Black's only chance, as keeping the queens on the board with such an open king position would not lead to anything good.
11.Qd2 Qxd2+ 12.Kxd2
Let us take a fresh look at the position. White's pawn structure is better and even though Black has the bishop pair, the hole on d6 and much more active pieces promise White very nice play.
12...Nd7
Black is still hoping to play c5, which would finally open the g7 bishop.



13.c5!
Mamedyarov continues being principal and playing against the bad bishop on c8.
13...h5?!
The idea of this move is of course correct, it is nice to get rid of the threats on the h-file, but it gives White a full move to create new threats. [13...00 followed by e5 would at least leave Black with some hope.]
14.b4
Securing the pawn structure, which is very important to keep the black pieces passive, but White was clearly not in a hurry to play it immediately. Maybe 14.Bc4 would have been a better choice.
14...00 15.Bc4 Already taking steps of preparation against e5, after which the pawn on f7 is going to become White's target.
15...Rd8 16.Ke3 e5 This move is premature. [Black should have included 16...a5! 17.a3 and only now 17...e5 The possibility of axb4 would give Black some extra chances. Of course White should still be better here.]
17.Nd6 As expected White is going for the f7 pawn.
17...exd4+



18.Kf4
Another important move. The white king not only finds himself in a safe position on f4, but he also takes away Black's opportunity of playing Ne5 next.
18...Nf8 [A very passive move like 18...Rf8 19.Rae1 followed by Re7 would lead to an almost winning position for White.]
19.Bxf7+
[19.Nxf7 Be6 20.Nxd8 Bxc4 Black has good practical chances here.]
19...Kh7 20.Rae1 White brings his last passive piece into the game.
20...a5
And of course Black needs to look for some counterplay.
21.Nh2?!
What a funny move! White just wants to play g4 next. But this kind of creativity was not really needed. [After the much more simple 21.Re7 Rd7 (21...axb4 didn't help either since after 22.Nxc8 Raxc8 23.g4 White is mating on the h-file.) 22.Rhe1 axb4



23.Ne8 it is hard to imagine Black surviving.]
21...axb4 [White is probably also better after 21...d3 22.g4 d2 23.Re4 and somehow White has covered all of Black's ideas.]
22.g4 It is very hard for Black not to get mated here.
22...Rxd6? Karjakin panics. [Black should have continued staying cool: 22...d3 23.gxh5 gxh5 24.Nf3 Even if Black's position looks lost, things are actually much more complicated. 24...Bg4! With a very complex position.]
23.cxd6 White is not only an exchange up, but he also has a strong passed d-pawn. Black's position is lost.
23...Ra5 24.Re7
To put a rook on the 7th rank is never wrong.
24...d3 25.gxh5
White is finally opening the h-file.
25...gxh5 26.Nf3 Bg4
Black defended from an immediate mate, but the problems on the 7th rank are unsolvable. 27.Nh4 With the threat of playing f3 next, a deadly threat...
27...Rxg5
The last trick.



28.f3 White is of course not falling for it! [Of course not 28.Kxg5?? Bh6+ 29.Kf6 Bg7+ 30.Kg5 Bh6+ with a draw!] 28...Bf6 29.fxg4 White is already a full rook up.
29...Rxg4+ 30.Kf5 Rxh4
And here comes the pretty
31.Kxf6
A very nice win by Mamedyarov, with good strategical play followed by a nice attack.


10


View the game

More annotated games, tactics & endgame puzzles, surprise section/study can be found in the weekly Chess Evolution bulletin. 25 pages total. Subscribe!

Related materials:
GM Anand - GM Kramnik annotated by GM Balogh
GM Karjakin - GM Khenkin annotated by GM Balogh
GM Ipatov - GM Kramnik annotated by GM Naiditsch
GM Kramnik - GM Aronian annotated by GM Balogh
GM Nakamura - GM Kramnik annotated by GM Naiditsch
GM Salgado Lopez - GM Balogh annotated by GM Balogh
GM Naiditsch - GM Socko annotated by GM Naiditsch
GM Bacrot - GM Ivanchuk annotated by GM Balogh
GM Svidler - GM Nakamura annotated by GM Naiditsch
GM Karpov - GM Pelletier annotated by GM Balogh
GM Korobov - GM Vitiugov annotated by GM Naiditsch
GM Adams - GM Aronian annotated by GM Balogh
GM Bacrot - GM Giri annotated by GM Naiditsch
GM Nakamura - GM Gelfand annotated by GM Balogh
Kramnik-Grischuk annotated by Naiditsch
Ivanchuk-Grischuk annotated by GM Naiditsch
Laznicka-Topalov annotated by GM Balogh
Caruana-Ivanchuk annotated by GM Naiditsch
Ushenina-Yifan annotated by GM Naiditsch
Naiditsch-Vallejo annotated by GM Naiditsch
Kramnik-Andreikin annotated by GM Naiditsch
Andreikin-Sivlder annotated by GM Naiditsch
Ivanchuk-Kramnik annotated by Chess Evolution GM Team
Kamsky-Mamedyarov annotated by GM Naiditsch

Bookmark and Share



Be first to comment this article

Write Comment
Name:
E-mail
Homepage
Title:
BBCode:Web AddressEmail AddressBold TextItalic TextUnderlined TextQuoteCodeOpen ListList ItemClose List
Comment:



Code:* Code

Last Updated ( Monday, 30 December 2013 )
 
< Prev   Next >